Posts Tagged papal election

Will Pope Francis Be ‘More Inclined to Embrace than Wag a Finger in Rebuke’

Editorial: Francis’ Election Full of Symbols, Signs of New Era

The symbols from the start were breathtaking. For a community whose narrative is woven deeply with symbols great and small, those advanced by Pope Francis since he stepped onto the balcony above St. Peter’s Square in a simple white cassock became more awe-inspiring as the days wore on.” Editorial in National Catholic Reporter

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

2005 Cardinal Bernard Law In; 2013 Cardinal Keith O’Brien Out

Vatican Shifts Tone on Cardinals Linked to Sex Scandals

Before the election of Pope Benedict XVI, the Vatican circled the wagons around cardinals ensnared in sex abuse scandals. As the church prepares to pick Benedict’s successor, those embattled cardinals increasingly find themselves under the wagon wheels. In a wide-ranging news conference on Monday, the Vatican struck a markedly blase tone when asked about the decision by British Cardinal Keith O’Brien not to attend the conclave to elect the next pope. Hours earlier, the Vatican had accepted O’Brien’s immediate resignation over sexual harassment accusations. Whereas the Vatican made clear in 2005 that disgraced Cardinal Bernard Law of Boston was expected to report to the Sistine Chapel, on Monday it said it had nothing to do with O’Brien’s announcement.” By Jason Horowitz, The Washington Post

British Cardinal’s Resignation Underscores Challenge to Catholic Church’s Moral Authority

When Prime Minister David Cameron unveiled his plan to legalize same-sex marriage last year, Britain’s highest Roman Catholic cleric took to the national pulpit. Cardinal Keith O’Brien decried a “tyranny of tolerance,” calling gay marriage “grotesque” and saying no secular government had the moral authority to legalize such unions. On Monday, O’Brien, one of the church’s most strident voices against homosexuality, abruptly stepped down amid allegations of “intimate” acts with priests. His fall underscored perhaps the greatest challenge for the Roman Catholic hierarchy as it moves to elect a new pope: regaining its own moral authority.” By Anthony Faiola, The Washington Post

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

2 Comments