Posts Tagged Jamie Manson

Why does Francis’ passion for justice and unity stop short of women? / National Catholic Reporter

Francis’ boundless energy and dedication to peace and justice stands in stark contrast to the dithering way he is handling question of women deacons in his own church. His passionate cause for unity among churches and with people of other faiths, it seems, stops short of the women of his own church who are asking simply for more inclusive ways to serve. (National Catholic Reporter)

In June 2016, just after Pope Francis announced he would create a commission for the study of the history of women deacons in the Catholic Church, he joked to journalists, ‘When you want something not to be resolved, make a commission.’ Apparently, he wasn’t kidding after all.

“On May 7, while aboard the papal flight from Macedonia to Rome, Francis announced that, after three years of study, the papal commission was unable to find consensus and give a ‘definitive response’ on the role of women deacons in the first centuries of Christianity.

“He claimed that what remained unclear was whether women deacons received a sacramental ordination.

“‘It is fundamental that there is not certainty that it was an ordination with the same formula and the same finality of men’s ordination,’ he said.

“Anyone who has ever listened to Francis speak about women knows why this would be such a crucial distinction for him. Like popes before him, Francis believes strongly that women are not entitled to sacramental power or authority and that it is God’s intended purpose that men and women have different roles in the church.”

By Jamie Manson, National Catholic Reporter — Read more …

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Stop shaming women for seeking equal power in the church / National Catholic Reporter

In late June, on a flight back from Armenia, Pope Francis told a team of reporters that he was angry.

“What made Francis angry wasn’t the continued deaths of countless refugees, or the latest instance of environmental degradation or some grim statistics about rates of human trafficking. No, what angered him was the suggestion, by some in the media, that he had ‘opened the door to deaconesses,’ after his May 12 dialogue with the International Union of Superiors General (UISG) …

“But the pope’s anger over the notion that admitting women to some form of the diaconate was already a fait accompli suggests the depth of angst conjured by even the suggestion of offering women a semblance of authority in the church.”

By Jamie Manson, National Catholic Reporter — Click here to read the rest of this column.

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In meeting with Fellay, Pope Francis shows double standard in the ‘culture of encounter’ / National Catholic Reporter

Earlier this week (Apr. 4), NCR’s Joshua J. McElwee reported that, on April 1, Pope Francis met with Bishop Bernard Fellay, the Superior General of the Society of St. Pius X. Founded in 1970 by Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, the Society widely rejects the teachings of the Second Vatican Council.

“According to the society’s website, the ‘false teachings’ of Vatican II include the Council’s exhortations on religious liberty, ecumenism, liturgical reforms, collegiality and what they call the ‘modernist’ idea that ‘that the human conscience is the supreme arbiter of good and evil for each individual.’ The society is an ardent defender of the Tridentine Mass (Fellay’s liturgical dress rivals any garb donned by Cardinal Raymond Burke) and believes passionately in the supremacy of the Roman Catholic church over all other religions …

“If Francis can offer a forty-minute, private meeting to a formerly excommunicated bishop who has been performing the sacraments illicitly for decades and who believes that the Catholic church is laced with false teachings, why can’t the pope also extend the same invitation to Catholic theologians, ethicists, and lay ministers who challenge the church’s teaching on women’s ordination, the use of contraception, and the full inclusion of LGBTQ persons?”

By Jamie Mason, National Catholic Reporter — Click here to read the rest of this column.

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The Vatican’s #LifeofWomen video project: the bad, the ugly and the good / National Catholic Reporter

On the fifth day of Christmas, the Vatican seemingly gave a gift to Catholic women across the world.

“No, it wasn’t five golden rings, but rather, the chance to make a one-minute video for the Pontifical Council for Culture.

“The Pontifical Council for Culture, which is one of the ‘dicasteries’ or departments of the Roman Curia, announced that its February assembly would be dedicated to the theme of ‘Women’s Cultures.’

“The Dicastery invited all Catholic women (or at least those who were paying attention to the Vatican website in the days after Christmas) to upload a brief video response to questions that seem better suited to an adolescent youth group: ‘Who are you?’ and ‘What do you think about your being a woman?’ and ‘What do you think about your strengths, your difficulties, your body, and your spiritual life?’”

By Jamie Manson, National Catholic Reporter — Click here to read the rest of this article.

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Long Island bishop claims proposed bill penalizes ‘only the Catholic church’ / National Catholic Reporter

Bishop William Murphy of the diocese of Rockville Centre, N.Y., has written a letter to Catholics on Long Island advising them that a proposed bill in the New York State Assembly, called The Child Victims Act, ‘seeks to penalize only the Catholic Church for past crimes of child sex abuse must also be recognized for what it is’ …

“The Child Victims Act (which is also known as the ‘Markey Bill’ because it is sponsored by State Assemblyperson Margaret Markey) would serve to protect children by removing the statute of limitations for crimes of sexual abuse of children and minors. It would also open a one-year period for victims previously shut out by New York’s outdated statutes of limitations to bring forth charges in civil court.”

By Jamie Manson, National Catholic Reporter — Click here to read the rest of this story.

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What’s eating Catholic women? / National Catholic Reporter

Two years ago, when Cardinal Gerhard Müller criticized the Leadership Conference of Women Religious for promoting radical feminist themes, the head of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith offered a stark reminder that feminism has no place in the Roman Catholic church.

“In his most recent interview in L’Osservatore Romano (the Vatican’s ‘semi-official’ newspaper), Müller further indicates that any suggestion of misogyny on the part of the hierarchy is a claim best answered with a punch line.

“Sadly, it’s a comedic lesson Müller likely learned from his boss, the pope …

“The time has come for the hierarchy to stop making jokes about gobbling up women and to start talking turkey about the ways in which the church’s structural sins exacerbate the suffering of women globally.”

By Jamie Manson, National Catholic Reporter — Click here to read the rest of this column.

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Time to Face Facts: Pope Francis Agrees with the Doctrinal Assessment of LCWR / National Catholic Reporter

On May 9, 2013, I wrote the following headline: “For LCWR, the more the papacy changes, the more it stays the same.”

“One year later, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, sadly, has confirmed my suspicions …

“Pope Francis and the women of LCWR share a deeply sacramental understanding of their calling to serve those on the margins of our world. They agree that it is in ministering to the poor, the sick, and the vulnerable that they touch the wounded body of Christ.

“Where they seem to disagree sharply, however, is in their understanding of religious life as a prophetic life form. When women religious touch the wounded body of Christ in their work, it breaks open their hearts in a way that compels them to ask deeper theological questions. It gives them the eyes to read the signs of the times and recognize the prophets in their midst. It gives them the courage ask bold new spiritual questions.”

By Jamie Manson, National Catholic Reporter — Click here to read the rest of this column.

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