Posts Tagged catholic church

‘They knew and they let it happen’: Uncovering child abuse in the Catholic Church / The Boston Globe

The Spotlight Team revealed the church’s secret protection of pedophile priests in a series with global repercussions.

The Boston Globe

“On his first day on the job in July 2001, Globe editor Martin Baron stopped by the desk of Eileen McNamara, a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist. A week earlier, McNamara had published a column about the Boston Archdiocese’s silence on three priests accused of sexually abusing children. One line, in particular, had irked Baron. McNamara had wondered whether an accused priest’s superiors had known about his crimes. Court documents were sealed. ‘The public,’ she concluded, ‘has no way of knowing.’

“McNamara recalls Baron standing over her desk: ‘Why don’t we find out,’ he said.

“Spotlight’s investigation of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church did not begin with a tip or newly obtained document, as so many investigations do. Instead, it started when a new Globe editor spurred his newsroom to action. After telling the Globe’s senior leaders he intended to pursue the story, Baron asked Spotlight editor Walter V. Robinson to make sexual abuse by priests his team’s next project.

“Robinson, a three-decade newsroom veteran, was taken aback. ‘Editors never told the Spotlight Team what to do,’ Robinson says. ‘The Spotlight Team told the editor what it was going to do.’ But it was clear that this wasn’t a debate. Robinson returned to Spotlight’s office and instructed his team — Michael Rezendes, Sacha Pfeiffer, and Matthew Carroll — to get to work.

“The story wasn’t new to them. The Globe had been covering the abuse cases for a decade, and other outlets had been on the story for even longer. ‘I always remind people we didn’t reveal the existence of priest sex abuse,’ Rezendes says. Rather, Spotlight set out to do what it does best: reveal the systemic problem behind the individual stories. ‘What we did that was new,’ Rezendes continues, ‘was show the scale of the issue and the coverup.'”

By Joseph P. Kahn and Mike Damiano, The Boston Globe — Read more …

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Pope Francis wants every Catholic to have a say. Why haven’t US Catholics heard about it? / National Catholic Reporter

Success for bishops not focused on controlling power will be listening and honestly reporting the needs of the people.  

National Catholic Reporter

“Pope Francis’ plan is for ordinary Catholics to have their say. It begins with the coming synod, which opens in Rome on Oct. 9 and in every diocese in the world on Oct. 17.   

“The problem: No one seems to know about it. The bigger problem: U.S. bishops don’t seem to care. 

“It’s called ‘For a Synodal Church: Communion, Participation, and Mission.’ While Francis truly wants all Catholics to pray and talk about the needs of today’s church, his plan depends on diocesan participation. As the U.S. bishops fulminate over which Catholic politician can receive Communion, they’ve done little to plan for the worldwide discussion on the needs of the church. They were asked to get organized last May. They haven’t. 

“Here’s how things are supposed to work. Last May, Rome asked every bishop for the name of the person managing his diocesan synodal process. The bishop then is to open his local synod Oct. 17, collect input from parishes, and report to his national episcopal conference.  

By Phyllis Zagano, Religion News Service, in National Catholic Reporter — Read more …

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Called to Contribute: Findings from an In-depth Interview Study of US Catholic Women and the Diaconate / By Tricia Bruce,

“Women comprise the majority of US Catholics and the majority of lay ministers in the U.S. Catholic Church. While the ordained diaconate remains the exclusive realm of men, women engage in expansive service that overlaps core diaconal functions in word, liturgy, and charity. Many women feel specifically called to be deacons or express an openness to discerning such a call should the vocational path become available to them. Escalating global attention to the question of women and the diaconate compels social scientific research to enhance knowledge regarding how contemporary women experience and fulfill their felt call in the Catholic Church.” By Tricia C. Bruce, Ph.D., author of “Faithful Revolution: How Voice of the Faithful Is Changing the Church”

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Voice of the Faithful Focus News Roundup

September 21, 2021

TOP STORIES

Listening to the Faithful: Vatican releases Synod Preparatory Document
The General Secretariat for the Synod of Bishops presents the base text and ‘vademecum’ – or handbook – to guide the journey of the Synod on Synodality. Listening without prejudice; speaking out with courage and parrhesia; dialoguing with the Church, with society, and with the other Christian confessions. The General Secretariat for the Synod has published the Preparatory Document, along with a Vademecum (or handbook) to indicate the guiding principles that will direct the path of the Synod on Synodality(link is external). The solemn opening of the Synod will take place in Rome on October 9-10, and in the particular Churches on October 17; and will conclude in the Vatican in 2023 with the assembly of bishops from around the world. The Preparatory Document, released on Tuesday, is intended above all to be an instrument facilitating the first phase of listening and consultation of the People of God in the particular Churches, which will take place from October 2021 to April 2022.” By Salvatore Cernuzio, Vatican News

Pope Francis is preparing a radical reform of the church’s power structures
“In 2001, Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio was a rapporteur for the summit of bishops at the Vatican — and he did not like what he saw. The Catholic Church had adopted a top-to-bottom approach that stripped local churches of any decision-making power, and the synod of bishops was reduced to nothing more than a stamp of approval(link is external) for prepackaged conclusions made in Rome. When Bergoglio emerged as Pope Francis in the 2013 conclave, the synodal process was high on his list for reform.” By Claire Giangravé, Religion News Service

New group discerning the future of a female diaconate
“Jessica Morel is approaching a heart-wrenching crossroads. Morel, a 42-year-old Catholic mother of four, is in the midst of a five-year education and discernment process with the U.S. Army to become a military chaplain. The problem is, there is no pathway for women to become Catholic chaplains in the military, and the military requires chaplains to be ordained. Seeking support, Morel discovered Discerning Deacons(link is external), an organization that brings together Catholics, including women discerning the diaconate, to learn, pray and discern the possible future of a permanent diaconate open to women.” By Sophie Vodvarka, National Catholic Reporter

Ex-Cardinal McCarrick, 91, due in court in sex assault case
“Former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, the once-powerful prelate who was expelled from the priesthood for sexual abuse, is due in court Friday (Sept. 3) to face accusations that he sexually assaulted a 16-year-old boy(link is external) during a wedding reception in Massachusetts nearly 50 years ago. McCarrick, 91, is scheduled to be arraigned and is expected to enter a plea in suburban Boston’s Dedham District Court more than a month after he was charged. McCarrick is the only U.S. Catholic cardinal, current or former, ever to be criminally charged with child sex crimes.” By Alanna Durkin Richer, Associated Press, in Cruxnow.com

Vatican won’t say if women can vote in upcoming Synod of Bishops
“Vatican officials declined on Tuesday (Sept. 7) to say if women would be able to vote on concrete proposals about the future of the Catholic Church at the end of a two-year process of consultation(link is external) of ordinary faithful that Pope Francis kicks off next month. For years, women activists and even nuns have pressed to be able to vote at Synod of Bishops meetings, which bring together the Catholic hierarchy to Rome to discuss pressing issues facing the 1.3-billion strong church.” By Nicole Winfield, Associated Press, in America: The Jesuit Review

ACCOUNTABILITY

The Catholic Church and the Art of the Coverup
“It was the summer of 2011, and I was summoned to the office of a psychologist in Dallas, and Raymond Fitzgerald, the President of Jesuit High School, who flew from New Orleans to attend. Jesuit paid for the psychologist as a part of their due diligence, to determine if I was telling the truth about my abuse at the hands of Peter Modica, a janitor, and Cornelius Carr, a Theology teacher at the school … Up until that point, there were the occasional civil suits. The Church would publicly lament in the media; ‘Who are these great accusers who are out to destroy our Church?’ when they damn well knew what they had done(link is external) and what they were doing. In that same breath, they were privately settling cases, and requiring our silence.” By Richard WIndmann, President of Survivors of Childhood Sex Abuse, in The Big Easy Magazine

Gonzaga sex abuse report recommends actions as university faces its own complicity
“Gonzaga University, a Jesuit-run institution in the state of Washington, has established a special research fund to study sexual abuse in the Catholic Church(link is external) and is taking steps to support local community members who have been particularly impacted by the crisis, especially Indigenous and Native students. Those initiatives are among several recommendations that were outlined in a 46-page report that the university released Sept. 1 from its University Commission on Gonzaga’s Response to the Catholic Sexual Abuse Crisis. The commission’s work coincided with media reports that detailed a decades-long pattern of sexually abusive Jesuits being permitted to live on campus while being shielded from accountability.” By Brian Fraga, National Catholic Reporter

FOR A SYNODAL CHURCH: COMMUNION, PARTICIPATION AND MISSION

Get ready: Another synod is coming
“Another synod will be taking place in the Archdiocese of Miami this year, but this time, Pope Francis will be doing the ‘listening.’ The archdiocese held its Second General Synod from April 2012 to October 2013, with Archbishop Thomas Wenski spending the summer of 2012 visiting more than a dozen parishes, sitting and listening to parishioners’ answers to several questions. Something similar will happen at the Synod of Bishops set to take place in October 2023 in Rome — except it will be the world’s bishops meeting, after listening to the world’s Catholics(link is external), and making recommendations to Pope Francis for the universal Church. The official title of this synod is ‘Towards a synodal Church: communion, participation and mission.’ The shorthand title is ‘Synod on synodality.’” By Ana Rodriguez-Soto, Florida Catholic of the Archdiocese of Miami

Catholic Church is failing to embrace reform, says McAleese
“The Catholic Church has yet to make positive progress towards being able truly to listen to the voices of minority voices and the laity as a whole(link is external), according to former President of Ireland Dr Mary McAleese. Addressing the Root and Branch lay-led inclusive synod, she said that she does not ‘find Pope Francis inspirational at all.’ She said: ‘Why have the hopes and promises of Vatican II disappeared to a dead end?’ Commenting on plans for the 2023 Synod of Bishops on synodality, she felt there was no move to stop lay discussion continuing to be ‘kept well away from matters of doctrine.’” By Scarlett Sherriff, The Tablet

POPE FRANCIS

Pope rejects German archbishop’s resignation over abuse
“Pope Francis has rejected the resignation of the archbishop of Hamburg, who offered to step down in March after a report faulted him for his handling of sexual abuse allegations in his previous diocese(link is external). The papal nuncio’s office in Berlin said in a statement Wednesday (Sept. 15) that the pontiff made his decision after two envoys traveled to Cologne in June to look into possible mistakes by senior church officials there in handling past sexual abuse cases. Stefan Hesse, Hamburg’s archbishop since 2015, previously served in several senior roles in the Cologne archdiocese.” By Geir Moulson, Associated Press

Former Irish president McAleese ramps up criticism of Pope Francis
“A former president of Ireland has expressed reservations about Pope Francis’ leadership of the global Catholic Church(link is external), telling a British church reform movement that the pontiff is ‘a conservative leader’ who is blessed with enemies who make him look more liberal than he is. Mary McAleese, a Catholic who served as the head of the Republic of Ireland from 1997-2011, cited the March document from the Vatican’s doctrinal office banning priests from blessing same-sex unions, on the grounds that God ‘cannot bless sin.’ By Sarah Mac Donald, National Catholic Reporter

Pope promotes theologian-priest who once testified against abusive mentor
“Pope Francis named a Chilean priest who had testified against his abusive mentor to be secretary of the Vatican’s Congregation for Clergy(link is external). Archbishop-designate Andrés Gabriel Ferrada Moreira of Santiago, the new secretary, replaces 76-year-old French Archbishop Joël Mercier, who retired in September. His appointment, announced Sept. 8, goes into effect Oct. 1. … The 52-year-old archbishop-designate was ordained a priest of the Archdiocese of Santiago de Chile in 1999. According to court testimony, in 1988 when he was 19, he met the late Fernando Karadima, a former priest who was defrocked by Pope Francis in 2018.” By Carol Glatz, Catholic News Service

Podcast: Can Pope Francis’ Latin Mass restrictions unify the church?
“This summer, Pope Francis made the controversial decision to place significant restrictions on the celebration of the Tridentine Latin Mass. He said that a survey of the world’s bishops showed that John Paul II and Benedict XVI’s generosity in allowing the pre-Vatican II Mass to be celebrated had been ‘exploited to widen the gaps, reinforce the divergences, and encourage disagreements that injure the church…and expose her to the peril of division(link is external).’” By Coleen Dulle, Inside the Vatican, America: The Jesuit Review

BISHOPS

The resignation of the Bishop of Broome raises some big questions for the Catholic Church
“Has the Catholic church in Australia, at its most senior levels, learned anything from the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse about good governance, transparency, and justice for those who are at the margins? The resignation of the Bishop of Broome, Christopher Saunders, has left a significant level of disturbance and dispute within the diocese.(link is external) He is 71, and it is unusual that Pope Francis has accepted the resignation of a bishop under the standard retirement age of 75. The matter has proven highly contentious. Sexual misconduct allegations have been aired, along with claims of significant managerial problems …” By Noel Debien, ABC Religion and Ethics

WOMEN’S VOICES

Blocked from serving their church, Catholic women push for female deacons
“Casey Stanton wanted to offer encouragement, love and healing to the inmates at the North Carolina Correctional Institution for Women, where she served as a chaplain intern a few years ago. But as a Catholic woman she could not represent her church there in any official capacity. The state of North Carolina requires chaplains in its state prison system to be ordained. And the Catholic Church does not ordain women — neither as priests, nor as deacons(link is external).” By Yonat Shimron, Religion News Service

CELIBACY& MARRIED PRIESTS

Priestly celibacy is holding back the Catholic Church
“Some mothers are so full of grace and love, that they move slowly through their world offering unconditional compassion to all, but rarely see the crisis forming in their own lives. I am afraid that the Roman Catholic Church is one example of a selfless mother that appears unwary and blind to the seeds of its own self-destruction(link is external), and sits inert, seemingly paralyzed.” By Guest Opinion by Stephen Bowman, Syracuse.com

FUTURE OF THE CHURCH

A Strategy for Launching a Eucharistic Revival
“In his article Separate Challenges (September 2021), Peter Steinfels argues that the U.S. bishops do not need another document on the Eucharist but rather a strategy on the Eucharist. Many bishops agree, and have therefore proposed developing a strategy designed to lead to a Eucharistic revival in our Church. The essential starting point must be the needs of our people as they live in this present moment and culture(link is external). Context is key. Every effort should be made to avoid an ahistorical presentation of the Eucharist that is abstracted from daily life. With that in mind, I offer five themes that might be considered in shaping a process that invites dialogue with the people we serve and reflects the pastoral, catechetical, and formational challenges that are specific to the U.S. context today …” By Cardinal Blase J. Cupich, Commonweal

How can Catholics Re–Member the Church when voices are so divisive?
At VOTF Conference Re–Membering the Church, speakers will offer answers to such questions and discussion of Catholic Church issues — Headlines declaim Latin Masses, Communion wars and Vatican II attacks. Amid this divisiveness, the international group of reform-minded Catholics called Voice of the Faithful wants to Re—Member the Church, which will be discussed during its upcoming 2021 conference(link is external). Featured speakers and attendees will look closely at the body of the Catholic Church to see how structure, power, participation and accountability can be brought together within the Church to fulfill its mission of bringing Christ to the world.” By Digital Journal

Concerned Catholics seek healing path from sexual abuse
“Ever since the world learned about priests and brothers abusing orphan boys at Mount Cashel, for 40 years Canada’s Catholics have lived with a public image of their Church as hypocritical and defensive. As more abuse scandals rumbled across headlines and through the courts, public contempt for the Catholic Church became commonplace(link is external). Add onto this mountain of shame all that we’ve learned lately about Indian residential schools. In response, a lay movement has been growing over the last year — a network of faithful lay Catholics who are not going to live with the scandals or the paralysis of their Church anymore. Concerned Lay Catholics have been inspired by Pope Francis to take ownership of their Church and its problems. There are representatives now in nine provinces, and growing.” By Michael Swan, the Cahtolic Register

VOICES

Six suggestions for the Catholic bishops’ document on the Eucharist
“The U.S. bishops are working on a document on the Eucharist, which could be very helpful if they do it right. The chances are slim.(link is external) The origins of the document go back to the bishops’ fight with pro-choice Catholic politicians, such as John Kerry, over the legalization of abortion. Some bishops, like Cardinal Raymond Burke, wanted to punish pro-choice Catholic politicians by denying them Communion. Other bishops, such as the late Cardinal Francis George of Chicago, disagreed. George said he did not want his priests playing cop at the Communion rail. The U.S. bishops’ conference did what it normally does when bishops disagree: nothing.” By Thomas Reese, Religion News Service, in National Catholic Reporter

Why the Catholic Church can’t put the clergy sex abuse scandal behind it
“A day of reckoning for a once powerful prince of the Roman Catholic Church had finally come. Frail and 91, former cardinal Theodore McCarrick was arraigned last week on charges that he sexually assaulted a 16-year-old boy at Wellesley College in the 1970s. As startling and historic as that event may be, it’s years too late for those he’s accused of having abused — and for a church that still struggles to put the clergy sex abuse scandal behind it. It probably never will(link is external), at least under the current generation of church leaders — not until there are no more victims, and no more clerics to hold accountable.” By  Joan Vennochi, The Boston Globe

Six suggestions for the Catholic bishops’ document on the Eucharist
“The U.S. bishops are working on a document on the Eucharist, which could be very helpful if they do it right(link is external). The chances are slim. The origins of the document go back to the bishops’ fight with pro-choice Catholic politicians, such as John Kerry, over the legalization of abortion. Some bishops, like Cardinal Raymond Burke, wanted to punish pro-choice Catholic politicians by denying them Communion. Other bishops, such as the late Cardinal Francis George of Chicago, disagreed. George said he did not want his priests playing cop at the Communion rail. The U.S. bishops’ conference did what it normally does when bishops disagree: nothing. It left to each individual bishop to do what he thought best in his diocese.” By Thomas Reese, Religion News Service

CLERGY SEXUAL ABUSE

We owe it to clerical abuse survivors to read the whole story
“On a beautiful day in the early summer of 2018, I was puttering around my apartment and getting ready for a parish visit. I was content in my work at an archdiocese, had recently returned from a stint at the Pre-Synod on Young People at the Vatican, and was knee-deep in wedding planning. To sound cheesy, I was loving church life. Out of the blue, as I was getting ready to leave for another day of the ministry work I loved, I received a call from a friend(link is external): ‘Nicole, we didn’t want you to find out elsewhere: Cardinal Theodore McCarrick has been accused of sexual abuse and the accusations were found credible. The story is about to break everywhere.’” By Nicole M. Perone, U.S. Catholic

‘Procession’: Film Review | Telluride 2021
Robert Greene’s latest film, created with six men who were abused by Catholic priests and clergy(link is external), is a collaborative exercise in trauma recovery. — Memories of trauma — buried deep within the body, locked in a casket of shame — are difficult to excavate. Remembering can be a different kind of violence, so the mind resists recollecting that which has been shunned in the name of self-protection. But what happens when concealing no longer provides a certain level of safety? When the memories erupt and, in an astonishing turn of events, the mind betrays the body?” By Lovia Gyarkye, Hollywood Reporter

CALIFORNIA

Catholic Church pays $23.9 million to victims sexually abused by priests
“Six California Catholic dioceses including Fresno, which covers most of the Central Valley, paid $23.9 million to 197 victims abused by clergy members who opted to settle their claims instead of filing lawsuits(link is external). The last claim from victims had been processed by the Independent Compensation Program (ICP) for Victims of Sexual Abuse by Diocesan Priests in California on Sept. 2, according to announcement by the Independent Oversight Committee. The dioceses launched the ICP in September 2019 to provide any victim/survivor of childhood sexual abuse by a priest a non-adversarial resolution, regardless of when the abuse occurred … Together, the participating dioceses comprise more than 10 million Catholics, or about 80 percent of California’s Catholic population.” By the Lost Angeles Sun Gazette

Fresno Catholic Diocese speaks out on resignation, abuse allegations against former priest
“The Diocese of Fresno has remained mostly quiet about the allegations of abuse at parishes in Firebaugh and Bakersfield made against former Monsignor Craig Harrison. ‘I’ve been asked by our bishop to read this letter to you this morning,’ said a clergy member at St. Francis Church in Bakersfield. ‘The Diocese of Fresno did receive allegations of misconduct involving seven minors against Craig Harrison(link is external),” the letter read. After an internal investigation, the letter explains the Diocesan Review Board looked over each allegation and found them to be credible. Those findings led to a case being opened within the Vatican.” By Alyssa Flores, KFSN-TV30 News

ILLINOIS

Letter from Cardinal Blase J. Cupich, archbishop of Chicago, on the reinstatement of Father David F. Ryan
“Dear Parishioners of St. Francis de Sales Parish: Last November, I informed you of an accusation against your pastor, Father David F. Ryan, and that, in keeping with our procedures, he was asked to step aside from his pastoral duties until a thorough investigation and process could be completed. He has fully cooperated with civil authorities and the Archdiocese of Chicago during these months. Following the determination by state officials, who are charged with the protection of minors, that the allegation of child abuse was unfounded(link is external), the Independent Review Board of the Archdiocese of Chicago investigated the allegations in accordance with our usual procedures.” By Cardinal Blase J. Cupich, Archbishop of Chicago, on archchicago.org

How Nate Lindstrom’s death by suicide spurred a push for more accountability on clergy sexual abuse
“By the time he was in his mid-30s, several years after he confided to his family that he’d been the victim as a teenager of sexual abuse by three priests, Nate Lindstrom was ‘really falling apart(link is external)’ mentally and emotionally, according to his parents. So they turned to the Norbertines, a Catholic religious order in Wisconsin. Lindstrom had told his family he’d been molested beginning the summer before his freshman year of high school in Green Bay, Wis., by Norbertine priests, including the Rev. James W. Stein, then a charismatic young cleric, who later ministered in Chicago.” By Robert Herguth, Chicago Sun-Times

Archdiocese of Chicago removes 3 priests amid investigations into ‘inappropriate’ conduct
“The Archdiocese of Chicago is removing three priests from ministry, pending investigations into what the church calls ‘inappropriate’ conduct(link is external). In letters to parishioners Saturday (Sept.4), the archdiocese said these priests are stepping aside for relationships with other adults. The archdiocese said none of the incidents involved children. The letters also said the priests all acknowledged their behavior.” By WLS-TV7 News

KANSAS

DA drops sex abuse case of KCK priest. Trial ‘not in the best interests’ of victim
“Wyandotte County prosecutors have dismissed a criminal case against a Catholic priest in the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas charged with sexually abusing a minor(link is external). The Rev. Scott Kallal faced two felony counts of aggravated indecent liberties with a child stemming from incidents that allegedly occurred in 2015. Kallal’s case went to trial in September 2019 and ended in a hung jury. A new trial — delayed due to COVID-19 — was set to take place next year, but the Wyandotte County District Attorney’s Office dismissed the case last week. The action was announced Wednesday (Sept. 8) by the KCK archdiocese.” By Judy L. Thomas, The Kansas City Star

MASSACHUSETTS

Priest who led Lowell, Marlborough churches barred from public ministry, sentenced to ‘life of prayer and penance’ for sexual abuse
“A Catholic priest who formerly led parishes in Lowell and Marlborough has been barred from public ministry after an ecclesiastical panel found him guilty of sexually abusing a minor(link is external) in the 1960s, the Archdiocese of Boston said Friday (Sept. 10). In a statement, the archdiocese confirmed the resolution of the case involving Rev. Paul J. McLaughlin, the former pastor of St. Peter Parish in Lowell and Immaculate Conception Parish in Marlborough. The statement said McLaughlin, 91, had been ‘found guilty of child abuse and his sentence has been affirmed by the Vatican to live a life of Prayer and Penance.’” By Travis Andersen, The Boston Globe

Task force to weigh in on handling of clergy abuse reports by Springfield diocese
“After more than a year of work, a group has recommendations ready for the Springfield diocese on how it can improve its handling of allegations of clergy abuse(link is external). The final report by the Independent Task Force on the Response to Sexual Abuse within the Diocese of Springfield is due to be released at 10 a.m. Wednesday (Sept. 8). The task force was initially led by retired Judge Daniel A. Ford of Pittsfield. He stepped down in early June citing a perceived conflict of interest over his role, due to his work with the law firm Egan Flanagan & Cohen, which has long represented the diocese, including on clergy abuse legal matters.” By Larry Parnass, The Berkshire Eagle

Catholic priest charged with rape still going to trial Oct. 5
“The trial for the Catholic priest with Cape ties charged with rape is still set to take place at the beginning of October(link is external). Fairhaven resident Mark Hession, charged with two counts of rape, indecent assault and battery on a child 14 and under and intimidating a witness, will face a jury trial starting Oct. 5. Hession pleaded not guilty in January to the charges. Hession served at 12 institutions in the Cape Cod and Fall River areas, including as parish priest from 2000 to 2014 at Our Lady of Victory Church in Centerville.” By Jessica Hill, Cape Cod Times

Diocese vows to be timely, transparent in sex abuse cases
“The Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield on Wednesday (Sept. 8) promised to adopt a series of measures intended to improve its handling of sexual abuse allegations(link is external). The measures were recommended by a task force the diocese commissioned more than a year ago amid criticism of its handling of complaints. The panel issued its final report Wednesday and Bishop William Byrne said he will accept its suggestions.” By Associated Press

NEW MEXICO

Archdiocese of Santa Fe’s legal fees exceed $2.3 million in bankruptcy case
“A nearly 3-year-old bankruptcy case filed amid hundreds of child sexual abuse allegations has cost the Archdiocese of Santa Fe more than $2.3 million in legal fees alone(link is external). Federal court records show the Roman Catholic institution has used the services of at least four law firms with expertise in cases involving clergy sexual abuse and bankruptcy. The archdiocese seeks to reach a settlement with 385 claimants in its December 2018 Chapter 11 filing with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Albuquerque. This archdiocese and many dioceses across the nation, including the one in Gallup, have claimed bankruptcy in the Catholic Church scandal that began to receive attention in the early 1990s.” By Rick Ruggles, Santa Fe New Mexican

Santa Fe archdiocese denies it told principal not to report alleged sex abuse
“An official with the Archdiocese of Santa Fe has denied the organization directed Santo Niño Regional Catholic School Principal Robin Chavez not to report to law enforcement a concern of possible child sexual abuse by a school employee(link is external). In a statement Saturday (Sept. 4), the archdiocese said, ‘At no time did we, nor would we ever, tell a school not to contact the authorities. That is a direct violation of our Policy of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe Abuse Awareness Training for Adults Relating to Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Harassment.’” By Rick Ruggles, Santa Fe New Mexican

NEW YORK.

Three Priests With Ties To Area Put On Leave
“Three retired priests with ties to northern Chautauqua County have been placed on administrative leave. Bishop Michael W. Fisher of the Buffalo Catholic diocese said action was taken after officials were informed that informational documents have been filed with the federal Bankruptcy Court as part of the diocese’s chapter 11 reorganization proceeding. Specifically, bankruptcy claimants have filed confidential documents containing information about their allegations against the priests(link is external).” By The Post-Journal

OHIO

‘There’s no escape’: Memories of being raped by Catholic priest haunt Columbus man
“The metal clink of a belt being unbuckled. The room coming in and out of focus. The pressure with which the older man pinned him to the floor. These are a few of the memories that come back to Chris Graham in snapshots from years ago, when he was raped by a Catholic priest at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church in Powell. He was 14 years old(link is external). … Graham was a dedicated altar server at the time who looked up to priests at the parish so much that he considered becoming one.” By Danae King, The Columbus Dispatch

WASHINGTON

GU commission releases report on Catholic sexual abuse crisis
“The University Commission on Gonzaga’s response to Catholic Sexual Abuse Crisis released its 18-month report on Wednesday (Sept. 7) with recommendations for GU President Thayne McCulloh on how the university can progress as a Jesuit institution given its specific historical and geographic context. The report stops short of issuing a formal apology or putting particular parties at fault for the presence of priests with a history of sexual abuse on the university’s premises(link is external), but offers future strategies to the president for how to ameliorate the situation going forward.” By Asher Ali and Devan Iyomasa, The Gonzaga Bulletin

ARGENTINA

Argentine priest sentenced to 17 years for abuse of minors
“Just two months after the founder of his order was given a 12-year jail sentence and defrocked for sexually abusing minors, Argentine Father Nicolas Parma Wednesday (Sept. 8) was sentenced to 17 years in prison on the same charges(link is external). Formerly a member of Argentina’s Hermanos Discípulos de Jesús de San Juan Bautista, or ‘Brother Disciples of Jesus of St. John the Baptist,’ Parma was accused by multiple people of sexual abuse in 2016 alongside the order’s founder, ex-priest Augustin Rosa.” By Elise Ann Allen, Cruxnow

AUSTRALIA

NSW pedophile priest believed own ‘lies’
“A Catholic priest and convicted pedophile must have believed his own lies(link is external) to give ‘demonstrably’ untrue evidence you could ‘poke a million holes through,’ a judge told a court. Anthony William Peter Caruana, 79, prayed silently in an isolated suite in prison before his second sentence hearing began in the NSW District Court on Wednesday (Sept. 15).” By Greta Stonehouse, 7News.com.au

‘I guess it’s closure’: $1m settlement for victim of clerical abuse
“A former student at Rupertswood Salesian College in Sunbury has received a $1 million legal settlement more than 30 years after he was raped by Catholic priest(link is external) David Rapson. While the money will help him deal with his ailing health, Ben Monagle says nothing can compensate for the harm caused by Rapson, which triggered decades of drug abuse, mental health problems, criminal offending and estrangement from his four children.” By Cameron Houston, The Age

CANADA

Montreal archbishop’s ombudswoman issues first report on abuse complaints
“Since May 5, 2021, the phone has been ringing at least once a day at the home of Marie Christine Kirouack, the Montreal lawyer to whom Archbishop Christian Lépine has entrusted the responsibility of receiving all complaints of abuse and inappropriate behavior committed by priests, staff members and volunteers of the Archdiocese of Montreal(link is external). Since the ombudswoman was named last spring, she has received hundreds of calls and many emails. In her very first quarterly report, released Sept. 9, Kirouack revealed that among all these calls, 29 denunciations were received and analyzed because they were related to sexual, physical, psychological or financial abuse.” By Frrancois Gloutnay, Catholic News Service, in The Catholic Register

Inuit upset ‘devil priest’ isn’t being pursued by federal government
“It may be too late for Marius Tungilik, but it’s not too late for other Inuit who allege they were sexually abused by a Roman Catholic priest(link is external) at residential school in Nunavut. “I owe it to my friend, Marius, and the five other [alleged] victims,” said Inuit elder Peter Irniq. Irniq has been lobbying for more than 10 years for Canada to prosecute retired priest Johannes Rivoire for suspected sexual abuse of children. ‘The RC [Roman Catholic church] is under pressure,’ Irniq said from his home in Ottawa. ‘The government can no longer ignore this.’” By Kathleen Martens, APTNNews.ca

GREAT BRITAIN, SCOTLAND, AND WALES

Report finds ‘shocking’ failings over child sex abuse
“Child sexual abuse has been found to take place in most major UK religions, according to the latest report by the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse. Some religious organizations were found to have no child protection policies in place at all.(link is external) IICSA found “blatant hypocrisy” and “shocking failings” among religious organizations purporting to teach right from wrong and yet failing to prevent or respond to child sexual abuse. The Child protection in religious organizations and settings report examines evidence received from 38 religious organisations in England and Wales.” By The Tablet

Scots ex-priest who claims he was sexually abused by Archbishop demands Vatican release secret report
“A former priest who says he was abused by shamed Cardinal O’Brien has called for a secret Vatican report into the allegations to be released(link is external). Brian Devlin, 61, was one of four priests who accused the Archbishop of St Andrews and Edinburgh of sexual misconduct in 2013. The scandal saw the disgraced cardinal – one of the most senior Catholic clerics in the UK – quit and apologise. In the aftermath, the Vatican ordered its own internal probe, carried out by Bishop Charles Scicluna. The bishop – who has gone on to become the Archbishop of Malta – was one of the Vatican’s best known sex abuse investigators.” By The Daily Record

HUNGARY

DK Calls for Probing Catholic Church Sexual Abuse Allegations
“The opposition Democratic Coalition (DK) called for a government investigative committee to be set up to look into alleged sexual abuses of minors within the Catholic Church(link is external). DK deputy leader Ágnes Vadai told an online press conference that the committee should not limit its investigations to individual sexual abuse cases, but should also work to expose ‘systemic shortcomings,’ insisting that the Catholic Church, which she said was ‘tied to the Orbán government,’ had made no attempt to look into any of the allegations.” By Hungary Today

INDIA

Less words, more actions needed to protect minors
“During the 2019 Summit of Bishops in Rome on The Protection of Minors in the Church, Catholic Church officials told a press conference that Pope Francis had given bishops a handout of 21 points — a road map for policy and law seeking to save children from abuses within the Church(link is external). On the last day of the summit, Cardinal Oswald Gracias, Archbishop of Bombay and member of Pope Francis’ Council of Cardinals, was among those addressing the press conference.” By Virginia Saldanha, UCANews.com

IRELAND & NORTHERN IRELAND

School of savagery: ‘Stuck forever in that room in Manchester with my trousers round my ankles’
“Overlying the violence and the terror there is something else. Msgr Duggan is the rector of the college, and word among the boys is that to go to his room for punishment involves dropping your trousers and underpants and is always followed by a groping(link is external) – and sometimes something worse. He is short and plump, his bald head is powdered to kill the shine, and his eyes are black, cold, dead buttons. He knows we fear him and in that knowledge he hugs his savagely twisted sexuality close – to him the smell of fear is an aphrodisiac.” By Mike Harding, The Irish Times

Woman celebrates after priest who abused her 40 years ago finally found guilty
“Fr John Joseph Murray (80) was found guilty by a jury at at Dungannon Crown Court last Friday (Sept. 3) of sexually assaulting two young girls(link is external). The unanimous verdict – which had been reached in under an hour – marked the end of the long and difficult road for two of his victims. They had both been chasing justice for 40 years. Sinead was just 11 when the abuse started. And this week as she stood outside the former St Matthew’s Parochial House in Bryson Street in east Belfast, the now 50-year-old said just being there sent shivers down her spine.” By Hugh Jordan, Sunday World

Church leaders express regret after falsely accused Irish priest takes his life
“Father Alan Griffin, who died in November last year, spent a year under scrutiny over abuse allegations without ever hearing the claims(link is external). In a response to a damning coroner’s report, church leaders accepted responsibility for their ‘poor investigation’ and ‘what went wrong.’ The earlier, scathing coroner’s report found ‘no complainant, no witness, and no accuser’ supported the allegations. Dublin-born Griffin had been a Church of England clergyman before converting to Catholicism in 2012.” By Nick Bramhill, IrishCentral.com

NEW ZEALAND

No abuse hearing in Dunedin called ‘slap in the face’
“A decision to not hold a Royal Commission of Inquiry into Abuse in Care hearing in Dunedin has been criticized as a ‘repulsive slap in the face’ for Southern survivors. The South, and Dunedin in particular, is considered one of the country’s epicenters for child sexual abuse in the Catholic Church(link is external). The royal commission says it has engaged with many Dunedin survivors and is committed to investigating their claims. But the Network of Survivors in Faith Based Institutions says it is failing to meet its obligations.” By Daisy Hudson, Otago Daily News

Catholic Church planned to house teen-sexting priest on primary school grounds
“The Catholic Church planned to accommodate a priest who was on bail for sex-messaging a 15-year-old girl at a house on the grounds of a primary school(link is external). Sosefo Sateki Raass, later found guilty of indecent communication with a person under 16 and sentenced to 100 hours’ community service, wasn’t told he couldn’t stay at the address until after his victim’s aunt complained to the Ministry of Education. Church officials proposed the bail address but didn’t tell police or the Auckland District Court it was so close to young children – even though Raass had a bail condition preventing any unsupervised contact with under-16s.” By Steve Kilgallon, Stuff.co.nz

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The Spirit in the Assembly: Preparing for the synod on synodality / Commonweal

“A global process set to mobilize millions and transform the world’s oldest and largest institution has so far registered as no more than a blip on the Catholic radar.”

Commonweal

“The most far-reaching event in the Catholic Church in my lifetime officially gets its start next month. It is Pope Francis’s boldest move yet, the historic shake-up that a Church brought low by sex-abuse scandals badly needs, and potentially the most transformative moment in Catholicism since the Second Vatican Council, which it seeks to embed permanently into the life of the Church. The two-year “synod on synodality,” launched in Rome on October 9 and in dioceses worldwide a week later, is set to mark Christianity forever.

“Yet who knows it is even happening? A global process set to mobilize millions and transform the world’s oldest and largest institution has so far registered as no more than a blip on the Catholic radar. Bishops briefed by Rome’s synod secretariat back in May have been mostly quiet about it, hiding behind cautious communiqués buried on websites, awaiting details, fearful of unleashing forces and expectations beyond their command.

“So we begin with a paradox. The path to the 2023 Synod in Rome, on the theme “For a Synodal Church: communion, participation and mission,” is designed to engage every diocese, every bishops’ conference, and every continental Church body. It will unleash the biggest popular consultation in history. It will require, as never before, the assembly of the People of God, in mass meetings at parishes and across dioceses around the world, who are being given “the ability to imagine a different future for the Church and her institutions, in keeping with the mission she has received,” in the words of the Preparatory Document released last week.”

By Austen Ivereigh, Commonweal — Read more …


Click here to read the Vatican news release announcing the 2023 Synod and to see list of links to Vatican and Voice of the Faithful resources to help understand the Synod.

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Blocked from serving their church, Catholic women push for female deacons / Religion News Service

“We’re looking at the needs of the church today,” said (Casey) Stanton (Discerning Deacons co-founder), who lives in Durham, North Carolina. “Might including women in this order help further the church’s mission in the world?”

Religion News Service

“Casey Stanton wanted to offer encouragement, love and healing to the inmates at the North Carolina Correctional Institution for Women, where she served as a chaplain intern a few years ago.

“But as a Catholic woman she could not represent her church there in any official capacity.

“The state of North Carolina requires chaplains in its state prison system to be ordained. And the Catholic Church does not ordain women — neither as priests, nor as deacons.

“Stanton, who is 35 and holds a master of divinity from Duke Divinity School, is not seeking to become a priest, which canon law forbids. She would, however, jump at the chance to be ordained a deacon — a position that would allow her and other women to serve as Catholic chaplains in prisons, hospitals and other settings.”

By Yonat Shimron, Religion News Service — Read more …

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How can Catholics Re–Member the Church when voices are so divisive

Headlines declaim Latin Masses, Communion wars and Vatican II attacks. Amid this divisiveness, the international group of reform-minded Catholics called Voice of the Faithful wants to Re—Member the Church, which will be discussed during its upcoming 2021 conference.

Featured speakers and attendees will look closely at the body of the Catholic Church to see how structure, power, participation and accountability can be brought together within the Church to fulfill its mission of bringing Christ to the world. As declared at a previous VOTF conference, “There is no body without its members. There are no members without participation. There is no participation without mutual recognition and accountability. Structural change is possible. Accountability is necessary. Re—Membering the church is essential.”

ReMembering the Church: Moving Forward takes place Oct. 22-23, 2021, via Zoom. At 7 p.m., Oct. 22, conference registrants will meet in free Zoom listening sessions to talk about issues affecting the Church. At 8:30 a.m., Oct. 23, registrants will gather in a Zoom waiting room for the 9 a.m. start of the all-day conference. Registration is $50, either online or by mail. College undergraduates register for free.

VOTF has long envisioned a Church of openness and respect between hierarchy and the laity, with more inclusivity, and with collaborations leading to activities and initiatives that reflect lay voices in the Church. To help present these ideas at the conference will be featured speakers Prof. Massimo Faggioli, Ph.D., professor of theology and religious studies at Villanova University, and Sister Carol Zinn, S.S.J., Ph.D., Leadership Conference of Women Religious executive director. Prof. Faggioli spoke at VOTF’s 2018 Conference, and the return of this internationally acclaimed theologian is highly anticipated. He is a prolific author and a leading worldwide authority on Catholic Church history and ecclesiology, that is, the inner workings of the Church. Sister Carol has served as consultant to the United Nations Economic and Social Council and is Saint John Vianney Center consultant for women religious community health and transition.

In addition, VOTF’s 2021 Conference will present a panel comprising women liturgy leaders from the Paulist Center Boston faith community, who will discuss lay-led liturgies, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. VOTF leaders also will offer presentations on VOTF projects in diocesan financial transparency; Church governance by and through lay involvement in Diocesan Financial Councils; adherence to protection of children guidelines in parishes and dioceses; and women’s emerging voices in the Catholic Church.


Voice of the Faithful’s® mission is to provide a prayerful voice, attentive to the Spirit, through which the Faithful can actively participate in the governance and guidance of the Catholic Church. VOTF’s goals are to support survivors of clergy sexual abuse, to support priests of integrity, and to shape structural change within the Catholic Church. More information is at www.votf.org.

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Voice of the Faithful “Voice Matters”

Read the Fall 2021 “Voice Matters” newsletter from Voice of the Faithful by clicking here.

http://www.votf.org/VoiceMattersNewsletter/VoiceMattersNewsletterFall2021.pdf

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Voice of the Faithful Focus News Roundup

September 6, 2021

TOP STORIES

Women deacons’ commission to hold first meeting
“Almost two years since Pope Francis announced he would be re-forming a commission on the female diaconate, The Tablet can report it is due to hold its first meeting in Rome in the middle of next month(link is external). The gathering of the commission comes just ahead of the launch of a global synod process which will bring lay people, priests and bishops in local churches together to discern new pastoral priorities. Women deacons are sure to be on the agenda … Pandemic permitting, members are expected in Rome for a week of discussions beginning on 13 September.” By Christopher Lamb, The Tablet

He blew the whistle on the Catholic Church in 1985. Why didn’t we listen?
“In May 1985, Jason Berry, a Catholic journalist in Louisiana, wrote his first piece on child sexual abuse in the church, for the National Catholic Reporter and the Times of Acadiana. Mr. Berry called himself a ‘reluctant muckraker,’ but his exposé on the Rev. Gilbert Gauthe would prove to be only the first in a series of exhaustive investigations over the years, including his 1992 book, ‘Lead Us Not Into Temptation.’ Mr. Berry appeared on national television programs … so why did it take another decade or more for this scandal to truly break?(link is external)” By Ben Proudfoot, The New York Times

A paradigm-shifting lectionary for the whole church
“Reviewing the Rev. Wil Gafney’s new A Women’s Lectionary for the Whole Church (Church Publishing) has filled me with gratitude and delight. This long-awaited resource is a rare combination of impeccable scholarship and pastoral usability. A Hebrew and rabbinic scholar and professor of Hebrew Bible at Brite Divinity School, Gafney also happens to be an Episcopal priest who preaches regularly. In the introduction to the new Lectionary she asks: What does it look like to tell the Good News through the stories of women(link is external) who are often on the margins of scripture and often set up to represent bad news? How would a lectionary centering women’s stories, chosen with womanist and feminist commitments in mind, frame the presentation of the scriptures for proclamation and teaching?” By Christine Schenk, National Catholic Reporter

Catholics aren’t disappointed—they’re exasperated
“My ministry focuses on speaking and writing about race and sexuality. Lately, in discussions after online lectures or webinars, I hear the following questions and comments with increasing frequency: “How can I remain a member of the church?”(link is external) “I don’t know how long I can stay.” “Why should I stay in the church?” “My kids/friends/relatives have left, and I don’t know what to tell them.” “Why would a gay or lesbian person stay Catholic?” “If the church doesn’t value or care about Black Catholics, why stay?” By Father Bryan Massingale, U.S. Catholic

Vatican exonerates Brooklyn Bishop accused of sexual abuse
“The Vatican has concluded that allegations of sexual abuse dating back a half century against the Roman Catholic Bishop of Brooklyn do ‘not have the semblance of truth(link is external),’ but an attorney for the accusers said they will continue to pursue their civil cases. Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the Archbishop of New York, said Wednesday that the Vatican has closed its investigation into allegations made separately by two men, who accused the Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio of abusing them a half century ago when he was a priest in New Jersey.” By Bobby Caina Calvan, Associated Press, on ABCNews.go.com

ACCOUNTABILITY

Expert says Poland experiencing a sea change on clerical abuse
“In the past year, 10 bishops in Poland have been removed from their positions and sanctioned by the Vatican(link is external), with the papal representative in the country openly acknowledging the reason – in most cases, cover-up of sexual abuse of minors by clergy. This quick succession of sanctions comes after decades of denying any wrongdoing on the part of Polish priests and religious regarding clerical sexual abuse, and it reflects a change in mentality among at least some within the bishops’ conference, who requested the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors to organize a conference for Church leadership in Central and Eastern Europe in Warsaw.” By Inés San Martín, Cruxnow.com

Pope replaces Australian bishop in alleged misconduct probe
“Pope Francis on Saturday (Aug. 29) replaced an Australian bishop who stepped down amid a Vatican investigation into what Australian media have described as allegations of sexual misconduct(link is external). The Vatican said Francis accepted Bishop Christopher Alan Saunders’ resignation as head of the Broome diocese in Western Australia state. Francis appointed another prelate, Bishop Michael Henry Morrissey of the Geraldton diocese, to temporarily administer the sprawling Catholic diocese in Broome.” By Associated Press

Vatican punishes Polish archbishop for sex abuse negligence
“Catholic Church authorities in Poland say the Vatican is punishing a retired Polish archbishop for his alleged negligent response to cases of sexual abuse of minors by clergymen under his authority(link is external). The Archdiocese of Wroclaw said the Vatican had reviewed reports of alleged negligence by the diocese former head, the retired archbishop Marian Golebiewski. The probe covered the years from 1996 to 2004, when Golebiewski was head of the Koszalin diocese, and 2004 to 2013, when he led the Wroclaw archdiocese. As a result, the Vatican has banned Golebiewski, 83, from appearing at any public religious or lay ceremonies and has ordered him to donate from his own pocket to a foundation preventing sexual abuse and supporting its victims. He is also to pray and repent.” By Associated Press

FOR A SYNODAL CHURCH: COMMUNION, PARTICIPATION AND MISSION

A radical shift away from a church with inflexible laws
“With the culmination of the Root and Branch Inclusive Synod in Bristol less than a month away, Sept. 5-12, there are early indications that the so-called ‘Bristol Text’ will be both deeply reflective and challenging to the current bishops’ position. The text will include brief, accessible statements on liturgical ministry, diversity, moral theology, and authority, backed by papers giving it historical and theological depth. Four international teams of distinguished theologians, jurists and thinkers, both lay and religious, have been meeting to consider the results of the synod’s year-long ‘journey of discernment(link is external).’” By Jon Rosebank, La Croix International, in National Catholic Reporter

If US church is to become synodal, we have a lot of work to do
“On Monday (Aug. 23), NCR published an interview with theologian Rafael Luciani, conducted by his Boston College colleague Hosffman Ospino. The two discussed synodality, which has emerged as one of the most important reform efforts that Pope Francis is trying to bring to the universal church. Luciani, who is a theological adviser to the Synod of Bishops, did a fine job explaining what synodality is and why we should all be excited about it. Now for the bad news. There is very nearly nothing about the Catholic Church in the United States that prepares us to engage synodality with the kind of fulsome embrace it requires(link is external). We — the bishops, the clergy, religious, theologians and the lay faithful — all have a lot of work to do.” By Michael Sean Winters, National Catholic Reporter

CLAR assembly was expression of synodality for thousands of religious from the Americas
“The virtual assembly for the Confederation of Latin American and Caribbean Religious was a three-day study in what it means for a modern religious life to be intercongregational, intercultural and itinerant(link is external). It was also a demonstration of those three values in real time. If done in person, the triennial gathering would have included dozens of religious leaders from each country’s religious conference traveling to a Central or South American city to meet in person and share side conversations and laughs between presentations, with a late-night cultural celebration as the weekend’s intermission.” By Soli Salgado, Global Sisters Report, National Catholic Reporter

A closer look at synodality and its promise for a more inclusive church
“My colleague Rafael Luciani is one of the world’s leading experts on the topic of synodality, the experience of ‘walking together’ rooted in the spirit of the Second Vatican Council(link is external) that Pope Francis has called on the Catholic Church to embrace. Luciani, a native of Venezuela, serves as a theological expert for the regional Latin American Episcopal Council (CELAM) and the Confederation of Latin American Religious (CLAR). He is also one of three Latin American theologians invited as expert advisers for the theological commission of the secretariat for the next Synod of Bishops.” By Hosffman Ospino, National Catholic Reporter

POPE FRANCIS

Pope addresses Vatican reforms aimed at curbing corruption, abuse
“While financial reforms in the Vatican are progressing steadily, cases involving corruption and malfeasance in the Eternal City are ‘a disease that we relapse into,’ Pope Francis said. In a wide-ranging interview broadcast Sept. 1 by COPE, the Spanish radio station owned by the Spanish bishops’ conference, Pope Francis said changes made in the Vatican’s financial laws have allowed prosecutors to ‘become more independent’ in their investigations(link is external). ‘Let’s hope that these steps we are taking … will help to make these events happen less and less,’ he said.” By Junno Arocho Esteves, Catholic News Service, in National Catholic Reporter

Pope Francis is tearing the Catholic Church apart
“In the summer of 2001, I drove up to Poughkeepsie, N.Y., to find what we called ‘the traditional Latin Mass,’ the form of Roman Catholic worship that stretched back centuries and was last authorized in 1962(link is external), before the Second Vatican Council changed everything. Back then, conservative Catholics called people who sought it out ‘schismatics’ and ‘Rad Trads.’ The Mass-goers there weren’t exactly a community; we were a clandestine network of romantics, haters of Pope John Paul II, people who had been jilted by the mainstream church and — I believe — some saints.” By Michael Brendan Dougherty, Pittsburgh Gazette

BISHOPS

Church investigation into Libasci allegations underway
“The Boston archbishop has launched a church investigation into allegations that New Hampshire Bishop Peter Libasci groped an altar boy(link is external) decades ago, the archdiocese signaled last week. In an email, a spokesman for the Archdiocese of Boston said the matter has been referred to the Washington-based apostolic nuncio, which is the point of contact between American dioceses and the Vatican. The referral follows a 2019 change in church law that governs how claims of abuse against bishops are handled, according to Terrance Dillon, a spokesman for the archdiocese.” By Mark Hayward, New Hampshire Union Leader

Vatican orders retired Polish archbishop to life of prayer, penance
“A retired Polish archbishop has been ordered to lead a life of prayer and penance, which includes a ban on taking part in any public celebrations(link is external) — both secular and religious, according to Vatican News and international media. The sanctions against Archbishop Marian Golebiewski, 83, the retired archbishop of Wroclaw and a former bishop of Koszalin-Kolobrzeg, came after a Vatican investigation looked into alleged negligence in handling allegations of abuse against minors by priests under his authority. The official announcement was published on the archdiocese’s website Aug. 21.” By Carol Glatz, Catholic News Service, in National Catholic Reporter

PRIESTS

Seminarian immersion program yields a harvest of pastoral experience
“When his alarm buzzes at 3 a.m., Daniel Sanchez prepares for a day in the fields alongside migrants who pick cherries and apples in Yakima, Washington, a central valley community known as the nation’s fruit basket. The 25-year-old isn’t one of the thousands of mostly Mexican workers who labor under an unforgiving sun that earlier this summer scorched this region with temperatures rising above 100 degrees. Sanchez is a seminarian in the Yakima Diocese, where all men studying to be priests are not only expected to study theology, philosophy and biblical exegesis, but also spend part of their summer learning from and ministering to migrants(link is external). Sanchez has done work as varied as pruning grape vines, sorting cherries and helping the migrants’ children learn to read English.” By John Gehring, National Catholic Reporter

RELIGIOUS WOMEN

Pope Francis appoints Italian Sister Alessandra Smerilli as interim secretary to the Vatican dicastery for human development
“Pope Francis has made some surprising decisions that could be the prelude to a major shake-up of the Vatican dicastery for integral human development. He has appointed Sister Alessandra Smerilli, 46, an Italian woman religious and economist, as ‘interim secretary’ of this important dicastery, the Vatican announced today (Aug. 26). The appointment makes Sister Smerilli the highest ranking woman in the Roman Curia and the first woman to hold such a senior-level post in the Roman Curia(link is external). The dicastery has been headed by the Ghanaian Cardinal Peter Turkson since Jan. 1, 2016, when it was first established through the merger of four pontifical councils.” By Gerard O’Connell, America: The Jesuit Review

CHURCH FINANCES

Former priest sentenced to 33 months in prison for stealing nearly $250,000 from Northeast Ohio parishes
“A former priest was sentenced Tuesday (Aug. 31) to 33 months in prison for looting nearly $250,000 from the accounts of three Northeast Ohio parishes(link is external), one of which closed soon after his thefts. Andrey Kovalenko, 53, pleaded guilty in May to 10 counts of mail fraud. Federal investigators said he stole from the churches’ accounts from May 2014 through July 2018, and pocketed the money for himself.” By John Caniglia, Cleveland.com

Court orders Catholic cardinal to face trial for land sales
“Catholic officials in Asia and beyond should pay attention to the court case against Cardinal George Alencherry in Kerala, a tiny state in southern India. Early in August, while upholding the verdicts of two lower courts, the Kerala High Court ordered Cardinal Alencherry to face trial for the sale of various holdings of Ernakulam-Angamaly Archdiocese(link is external) four years ago.” By Christopher Joseph, Catholic News Service, in The Tablet

Vatican’s former finance guru resigns from post at Swiss bank
“Just weeks after being indicted by the Vatican on charges of abuse of office over a shady London real estate deal(link is external), Swiss lawyer René Brülhart has resigned from his post on the board of a Swiss bank. However, Brülhart has insisted that his decision has nothing to do with the Vatican trial, but was made for other reasons.” By Elise Ann Allen, Cruxnow.com

CELIBACY& MARRIED PRIESTS

German bishop is skeptical about exempting priests from celibacy
“A German bishop who co-chairs the Synodal Path’s forum on priests said he is ‘skeptical’ about exempting Catholic priests from celibacy(link is external). Bishop Felix Genn of Münster said he accepted that people were deciding not to become priests because they did not feel called to celibacy, adding: ‘Perhaps they will then choose another profession in the church.’” By Catholic News Service in America: The Jesuit Review

FUTURE OF THE CHURCH

Breaking the Spell: What the Church’s critics miss
“Earlier this month, the New York Times devoted the entire Letters to the Editor section of its ‘Sunday Review’ to current controversies in the Catholic Church(link is external) (‘Where Does the Catholic Church Go From Here?’). The letters were all written in response to two columns, one by the Times’s conservative Catholic columnist Ross Douthat (‘The Ungovernable Catholic Church’) and the other by Matthew Walther (This is Why America Needs Catholicism’). Walther is the editor of the Lamp, a new Catholic bimonthly journal, and a contributing editor at the American Conservative.” By Paul Baumann, Commonweal

VOICES

Catholics deserve better homilies. Here are my top 5 tips for fellow preachers.
“‘This semester I’m taking a class on preaching. Out of curiosity, what are some of your pet peeves when hearing someone preach?’ (Tweet from Brother Vince Mary, O.F.M.) … The fact is, Catholics have lots of great advice for their priests. Here, with all the humility you might expect of a Jesuit, is my own list of top five suggestions for Catholic preachers today(link is external), as collated from the online responses to Brother Vince Mary’s tweet and my own life.” By Jim McDermott, S.J., America: The Jesuit Review

We’ve come a long way
“Just as many Catholic traditionalists were lamenting Rome’s new restrictions on the Tridentine Mass, I came across a prescient cri de Coeur written by a Catholic priest and published anonymously in the pages of the Atlantic back in 1928. To read it is to be reminded that some things never seem to change in the Catholic Church, while other things have changed a great deal, thanks be to God … As bleak as things looked to the good father back in 1928, I find his words now inspiring, precisely because they come from an era that today’s reactionaries yearn to return to,(link is external) blind as they are to the deficiencies of the religious formalism they idolize. This contemporaneous account of that era reminds us just how important the reforms of the past hundred years have been to ordinary Catholics.” By John W. Farrell, Commonweal

STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS

U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and Representative Gwen Moore Announce Legislation to Encourage States to End Statute of Limitations for Child Sexual Abuse
“Last week, U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) and Representative Gwen Moore (D-WI-4) announced the No Time Limit for Justice Act, a bill that incentivizes states to eliminate their statute of limitations for criminal prosecution and civil suits involving child sexual abuse(link is external). According to the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN), every nine minutes a child is sexually abused in the United States, but only twelve percent of these cases are reported to authorities each year. Studies have shown that the discrepancies in underreporting of minor sexual abuse can be largely attributed to the fact that a majority of child victims do not reveal their abuse until later in life, if at all.” By Sierra Sun Times

CLERGY SEXUAL ABUSE

The challenge of sexual abuse: What has happened since the February 2019 Summit
“In February 2019, Pope Francis invited the presidents of every episcopal conference to the Vatican for a Meeting on the Protection of Minors in the Church to address the issue of the sexual abuse of minors by members of the clergy. A similar meeting focusing on the region of Central and Eastern Europe will take place in Warsaw from September 19-22(link is external). In this article, Fr Federico Lombardi puts this regional meeting into the context of the Church journey thus far.” By Father Federico Lombardi, Vatican News

‘No recourse’: Abuse survivors have fewer legal options after Child Victims Act expires
“With the deadline to file lawsuits under New York’s Child Victims Act expiring last Saturday (Aug. 14), attorneys representing some of the survivors of sexual abuse say victims now have fewer paths for their stories to be heard in court(link is external). The Child Victims Act temporarily suspended the state’s time limit on civil lawsuits filed for sexual abuse claims when it was signed into law in 2019. Its deadline was extended by a year in August 2020, largely because of the pandemic.” By Fernando Alb, Press-Republican

CALIFORNIA

Other case against priest charged with sex crimes heads to circuit court
“A former priest accused of sexually abusing boys more than 40 years ago waived his right to a preliminary exam in Southfield’s 50th District Court on Thursday (Aug. 26), which sends the case to Oakland County Court for possible trial. Gary Berthiaume, 80, who served at Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Parish in Farmington and elsewhere, is charged with two counts of gross indecency between males – committing/procuring(link is external). He also faces charges of second-degree criminal sexual conduct that allegedly happened in Farmington. Berthiaume waived his right to a preliminary exam for those charges last month.” By Aileen Wingblad, The Oakland Press

HAWAII

Audit finds diocese in full compliance with sex abuse Charter
“An audit conducted in July found the Diocese of Honolulu in full compliance with the U.S. bishops’ ‘Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People,’ the set of procedures the bishops established in 2002 for addressing allegations of sexual abuse of minors by Catholic clergy. A letter dated Aug. 11 to Bishop Larry Silva from StoneBridge Business Partners Inc., the independent third-party organization contracted by the U.S. bishops to conduct diocesan audits, stated that ‘the Diocese has been found compliant with all audited Articles within the ‘Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People’ for the audit period of July 1, 2018, through June 30, 2021(link is external).’” By Patrick Downes, Hawaii Catholic Herald

LOUISIANA

Christian Brothers order sued by George Brignac victim; says it could have saved kids from sex abuse
“Though serial child molester and former Catholic deacon George Brignac has been dead for more than a year, the legal fallout from how local church officials handled one of the area’s most notorious clerical predators continued to unfold last week(link is external). A man who alleged he was raped as a boy by Brignac decades ago filed a lawsuit for damages against the Christian Brothers order, arguing that the organization should have stopped Brignac from ever becoming a deacon.” By Ramon Antonio Vargas and David Hammer, NOLA.com

MICHIGAN

Three men face multiple felony charges for child trafficking in Sault Ste. Marie
“Three men face multiple felony charges in Sault Ste. Marie in connection to child trafficking. According to the Chippewa County Sheriff’s department, among the three arrested on Sunday (Aug. 22) during a ‘ghost’ operation was 37-year-old Aaron Nowicki who is a non-practicing catholic priest. Nowicki is from Cheboygan but works in Sault Ste. Marie. According to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Marquette, Nowicki resigned and was removed from ministry in 2019 because of allegations of serious, but not criminal, sexual misconduct with a vulnerable adult(link is external).” By Jacqueline Agahigian, WLUC-TV6 News

NEW JERSEY

Camden diocese faces wave of clergy sex-abuse claims
“The Diocese of Camden faces 345 new claims of alleged clergy sex abuse as part of its ongoing bankruptcy case(link is external), according to attorneys involved in the dispute. The claims are currently in the early stage of a mediation process while the two sides also battle in U.S. Bankruptcy Court, said lawyers for clergy accusers. ‘An accurate accounting and inventory of all cases will be required before any meaningful settlement discussions can be undertaken,’ said John Baldante, a Haddonfield attorney who filed 70 of the claims.” By Jim Walsh, Cherry Hill Courier-Post

NEW MEXICO

Seeking accountability: Las Cruces woman says she was raped by priest as a child
“Rose Wiseman grew up in the Roman Catholic Church. She’d attend Mass at Our Lady of Health Parish on Mesquite Street with her grandmother, and her mother would take her to bingo night there. The church served as the hub of her community. She no longer believes in God, and no longer trusts those in authority. ‘I was forced to keep a secret for a long time,’ she told the Sun-News last week. ‘And I’m just not going to do it anymore(link is external).’” By Damien D. Willis, Las Cruces Sun-News

NEW YORK.

Bishop Salvatore Matano issues a Letter to the Faithful
“My dear brothers and sisters in Christ: On September 12th of this year it will be two years since the Diocese filed for bankruptcy under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code in order to address in the best and fairest manner possible the now approximately 475 claims(link is external) (this is the number of claims, not the number of persons accused) brought against the Diocese by the survivors of childhood sexual abuse by clergy, religious and laity.” By Bishop Salvatore Matano in Diocese of Rochester Catholic Courier

Father Varno withdraws from public ministry
“In light of allegations of sexual abuse that were first reported in a Child Victims Act (CVA) case(link is external), Father John ‘Jack’ Varno, a retired priest in the Diocese of Albany who serves as a sacramental minister in several parishes, has voluntarily withdrawn from public ministry while the case moves forward. The decision is effective immediately. While on leave, Father Varno will not publicly officiate at sacraments, wear clerical garb, or present himself as a priest. Father Varno maintains his innocence but has made the decision for the good of the parishes he serves and the Diocese.” By The Evangelist, the official publication of the Diocese of Albany

Former pastor, assistant pastor of St. Thomas accused of sexual abuse of children
“Rev. James Daley, a longtime pastor of St. Thomas the Apostle parish and who oversaw the renovations of the church that stands in the middle of town, was named in a summons of complaint filed in state Supreme Court in Albany County for alleged sexual abuse(link is external). Bishop Edward B. Scharfenberger announced today that he has asked the independent Diocesan Review Board to offer advisement on the following clergy, each of whom has an allegation of child sexual abuse filed against him through the Child Victims Act.” By Michael Hallisey, SpotlightNews.com

Priest accused of sex abuse worked in Coxsackie
“A priest accused of sexual abuse under the Child Victims Act(link is external) formerly was assigned to a Coxsackie church, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany said. The diocese released a statement Aug. 21 announcing that the Rev. Gregory Weider, 84, is on administrative leave following an allegation of sexual abuse. Weider had retired from full-time ministry in 2010 but had been working as Sacramental Minister at Sacred Heart in Margaretville and its mission, St. Anne’s in Andes. Weider had worked at St. Mary’s in Coxsackie from October 1977 to March 1982, the diocese said.” By Sam Raudins, Columbia-Greene Media

Another retired priest on leave; served in Schenectady, Amsterdam
“Retired Roman Catholic priest Father Gregory Weider was temporarily removed from public ministry, effective Aug. 14, by Bishop Edward Scharfenberger, prelate of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany, according to a statement issued by the diocese Saturday (Aug. 21). Weider, 84, was put on leave due to the filing of a sexual abuse-related allegation against him under the Child Victims Act(link is external), according to the release. The law included a one-year look-back window that allowed victims from 1970 and prior to sue, and was extended through Aug. 14 of this year due to the pandemic. The clergyman has been serving as a sacramental minister at Sacred Heart in Margaretville and its mission church, St. Anne’s in Andes, both in Delaware County.” By The Daily Gazette Staff Report

Buffalo Catholic Diocese substantiates abuse allegations against 7 priests, 1 unsubstantiated
“A Buffalo Catholic priest has been assigned to ‘permanent administrative leave’ and is restricted from practicing priestly duties after the diocese’s Independent Review Board ‘substantiated’ an allegation of abuse(link is external). Fr. Donald J. Lutz was ordained in 1970 and has served at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church in Buffalo and St. Leo the Great in Amherst, according to Horowitz Law, which is representing sexual abuse victims. ‘Reverend Lutz will also be subject to the monitoring program recently implemented by Bishop Fisher for clergy with substantiated abuse claims,’ according to the diocese.” By Marian Hetherly, WBFO-FM 88.7 National Public Radio

OHIO

Northeast Ohio man says Catholic diocese apathetic to his sexual abuse claims
“To a 13-year-old Catholic boy, it was a high honor. Especially for the wide-eyed boy named Jim Shackleton. Standing at the St. Ignatius of Antioch Catholic Parish altar alongside the priest, Jim finally felt special — chest out, chin up, and dressed in his black robe and white smock … ‘He would always have me go downstairs to the bottom part of the church and that’s where the sexual acts would happen(link is external),’ he said. ‘That’s how Father Rupp was able to get his hands on me…because I was working as an altar boy.’” By Phil Trexler and Rachel Polansky, WKYC-TV3 News

Father Drew case returns to court Monday
“The case of a Cincinnati-area priest accused of raping a 10-year-old altar boy(link is external) three decades ago returns court Monday (Aug. 23). This is expected to be the final hearing before Father Geoff Drew’s trial starts Oct. 25. Drew, 59, has pleaded not guilty to nine counts of rape. He remains at the Hamilton County jail in lieu of $5 million bond and faces life in prison if convicted.” By Jennifer Edwards Baker, FOX-TV19 News

RHODE ISLAND

Sex abuse case against Portsmouth Abbey, former teacher can move forward, judge rules
“A judge ruled a lawsuit levied by a 24-year-old New Mexico woman against Portsmouth Abbey School and a former teacher there may continue(link is external), despite a motion by the defendants last week to have the case dismissed. The woman, identified in the lawsuit as ‘Jane Doe,’ was a 15-year-old student at the Abbey in 2012 when Michael Bowen Smith, a humanities instructor then in his 40s, began a sexual relationship with her, according to the complaint. She said the school was negligent in failing to protect her ‘from the known or suspected abuse by Bowen Smith.” By Laura Damon and Sean Flynn, The Newport Daily News

WASHINGTON, D.C.

Report recommends actions for Gonzaga to move past Catholic Church sexual abuse crisis
“Formalizing protocol to ensure sexually abusive Jesuits are prohibited from missioning at Gonzaga University(link is external) is one of around two dozen formal actions a commission has recommended for the university to move past the Catholic Church’s abuse crisis. The recommendations, outlined in a report released Wednesday, were made to Gonzaga President Thayne McCulloh, who formed the 12-member commission in April 2019 as the university faced criticism for allowing sexually abusive priests to live on campus.” By Greg Mason, The Spokesman-Review

AUSTRALIA

Survivors abused by ‘sadistic’ priest win compensation battle, but money ‘won’t change’ impact
“Two men who were abused by a pedophile priest in regional Victoria(link is external) in the 1960s have reached landmark settlement agreements with the Catholic Church. The two abuse survivors were abused by Father Bryan Coffey between 1965 and 1968 while he served as assistant priest in Port Fairy, in south-west Victoria. The ABC understands the settlements are the first to be made in relation to Coffey, but about a dozen other victims have begun legal proceedings to seek compensation for his actions.” By Matt Neal, ABC South West Vic

Book affirms ‘every child needs a fair go’
“A new book designed to teach children about protective behaviours(link is external) will be launched at Perth Archdiocese’s annual safeguarding breakfast next month. Perth Archbishop Timothy Costelloe SDB will launch I am God’s Marvellous Creation, written for children aged 3 to 8 at the September 9 breakfast, which will coincide with National Child Protection Week, September 1-7. Andrea Musulin Perth Archdiocese’s safeguarding program director and author of the book, said this year’s Child Protection Week theme, ‘Every child in every community needs a fair go,’ was relevant ‘because not all children are receiving equal care and this is making child protection and the mission of safeguarding even more relevant in 2021.’ By CathNews.com

CANADA

Saskatchewan priest committed to stand trial on sex charges
“A Saskatchewan Catholic priest charged with sexual offences against a minor(link is external) was committed to stand trial after a preliminary hearing in Humboldt last week. The Crown and defence consented to Father Anthony Tei Atter’s committal after the complainant testified on Aug. 9, defence lawyer Brian Pfefferle confirmed. Testimony heard during preliminary hearings is banned from publication to preserve an accused’s right to a fair trial. A trial date will eventually be set in Saskatoon Court of Queen’s Bench.” By Bre McAdam, Saskatoon Star Phoenix

Former Prince George Catholic high school student alleges sexual abuse by teacher in ’90s
“A former student at O’Grady Catholic High School in Prince George has filed a civil suit alleging sexual abuse(link is external) in the early 1990s by a teacher who was a Christian brother. The student, now in his mid-40s and a medical technologist in Victoria, is named only as John Doe in the suit filed Aug. 16 in B.C. Supreme Court in Prince George. The student’s alleged abuser is named in the court filing but Postmedia News is choosing not to publish his name as there has been no response in court to the allegations.” By Gordon Hoekstra, Vancouver Sun

EAST TIMOR

Ex-Priest Who Operated East Timor Children’s Shelter Indicted for Sexual Abuse of Minors
“A former Catholic priest was indicted this week by a federal grand jury in Washington, D.C., for the alleged sexual abuse of children at a ‘shelter home’ he founded abroad(link is external). Richard Daschbach, 84, was on Thursday (Aug. 26) charged with seven counts of engaging in illicit sexual conduct in Timor-Leste, also known as East Timor. Daschbach, a U.S. citizen, was originally from Pennsylvania but has resided in what is now known as Timor-Leste for more than 50 years. He founded the Topu Honis shelter in 1992. Since 2018, at least 15 of his alleged victims have accused him of sexually abusing them while they were children residing at the shelter.” By Aila Slisco, Newsweek

GREAT BRITAIN, SCOTLAND, AND WALES

Tested in the fire – the whistleblower in the case of disgraced Cardinal O’Brien tells his story
“‘My son, if you aspire to serve the Lord, prepare yourself for an ordeal.’ The quotation from Ecclesiasticus, which was read out at my ordination, has followed me my entire life. Its shadowy presence never leaves me. It never will. I know that now. And I do. I do aspire to serve the Lord. I might not be very good at it at times – but if ‘serving the Lord’ means living an authentic life and doing my very best then, Yes. That is what I try to do(link is external).” By Brian Devlin, The Tablet

INDIA

Indian priest charged with rape, murder of nine-year-old girl
“A priest and three other men have been charged with the gang rape and murder of a low-caste nine-year-old girl(link is external), Indian police said, in a case that sparked days of protests in New Delhi. The girl was allegedly assaulted by the priest, 53, and three workers on August 1 after she had gone to a crematorium to fetch water. The four men, who have been in custody since they were detained in early August, face the death penalty.” By Agence France Press

Police chargesheet priest over minor’s molestation
“In a major development to the molestation of a minor allegedly by a priest in East Garo Hills last month(link is external), the district police has now filed a charge sheet against the accused following the completion of the investigation. The priest, Fr. James Parathanathu, had allegedly molested a 14-year-old girl at the latter’s residence while her parents had gone to work in their paddy fields. The parents of the girl had then they filed a police complaint after they came to know about the incident.” By The Shillong Times

ITALY

Priest in Perugia arrested on charges of child porn, prostitution
“A Sicilian priest who has been serving in the Archdiocese of Perugia for nearly 10 years has been arrested on charges of child pornography and child prostitution(link is external) after allegedly paying for explicit images of minors sent via online chats. A native of Caltavuturo, near Palermo, Father Vincenzo Esposito, 63, has overseen a parish in the San Feliciano neighborhood of Magione, in the regional province of Perugia, since his appointment there in 2013.” By Elise Ann Allen, Cruxnow.com

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Listening to the Faithful: Vatican releases Synod Preparatory Document / Vatican News


The General Secretariat for the Synod of Bishops presents the base text and ‘vademecum’ – or handbook – to guide the journey of the Synod on Synodality. Listening without prejudice; speaking out with courage and parrhesia; dialoguing with the Church, with society, and with the other Christian confessions.

Vatican News

“The General Secretariat for the Synod has published the Preparatory Document, along with a Vademecum (or handbook) to indicate the guiding principles that will direct the path of the Synod on Synodality. The solemn opening of the Synod will take place in Rome on October 9-10, and in the particular Churches on October 17; and will conclude in the Vatican in 2023 with the assembly of bishops from around the world.

“The Preparatory Document, released on Tuesday, is intended above all to be an instrument facilitating the first phase of listening and consultation of the People of God in the particular Churches, which will take place from October 2021 to April 2022.

“‘In other words,’ as the document says, ‘it constitutes a sort of construction site or pilot experience that makes it possible to immediately begin reaping the fruits of the dynamic that progressive synodal conversion introduces into the Christian community.'”

By Vatican News — Read more …


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